steeltoedboot
equ-estrian:

lifelineequine:

keepcalmandride-on:

backhomeinbromont:

The Pink Lady
Tails high, mane coiffuredThe Lady in Pinkis one adored.Riding the windsguiding her steedHer chances of winningare rosy, indeed.
 by Floridaborne

this looks like Ljubov Kochetova and Aslan in which case, she is definitely NOT adored and she’s more likely to break her horse’s neck in half than win a class

It does look like her

Lol she like ‘I know I’m fancy bish”

I see more of ‘Don’t take pictures of me ripping my poor horses face off’

equ-estrian:

lifelineequine:

keepcalmandride-on:

backhomeinbromont:

The Pink Lady

Tails high, mane coiffured
The Lady in Pink
is one adored.
Riding the winds
guiding her steed
Her chances of winning
are rosy, indeed.

 by Floridaborne

this looks like Ljubov Kochetova and Aslan in which case, she is definitely NOT adored and she’s more likely to break her horse’s neck in half than win a class

It does look like her

Lol she like ‘I know I’m fancy bish”

I see more of ‘Don’t take pictures of me ripping my poor horses face off’

eq-uine

shingekinovegan:

america-wakiewakie:

Millions of Dead Fish Mysteriously Surface in Lake in Mexico | Vocativ

Gaze across Lake Cajititlán here in western Mexico and normally you’ll see fisherman cutting their nets and tourist boats gliding over the blue-green water. But that picturesque scene turned grim last week when more than 4 million dead fish suddenly surfaced, turning the water a sinister shade of gray.

For days, the smell of rotting scales lingered in the air as locals joined government workers to scoop up more than 156 tons of freshwater popoche chub, a sardine-sized species native to the western state of Jalisco.

It’s still unclear what killed the fish, but the incident was the worst in a spate of environmental disasters in Mexico this year. Early last month, a river in the northern state of Sonora took on a sickly brown-red color after workers from a nearby mine dumped thousands of gallons of sulfuric acid into the water. In Veracruz state, near the Gulf of Mexico, a gasoline spill contaminated almost 5 miles of a small river near the town of Tierra Blanca. And last Thursday, the Pacific coast of Sinaloa state also saw a sudden and seemingly inexplicable mountain of dead fish rise to the surface.

Mexico, like many developing nations, has a poor environmental record, but it was still unusual for the country to experience such a quick succession of environmental disasters. What ties them together, critics say, are lax environmental standards, a complete lack of industry oversight and an inability to penalize people and companies that pollute.

“These cases are just the tip of the iceberg of the opacity in which industries in Mexico operate,” environmental watchdog Greenpeace said last week in a statement. “The laxity of the laws permit them to contaminate in exchange for derisory fines posing as ‘reparation of damages,’ without taking into account any external factors.”

The case of Lake Cajititlán is a classic example of how disasters often unfold in Mexico. Environmental experts are still trying to figure out what killed the fish, but that hasn’t prevented the authorities from bickering over who or what was to blame.

(Read Full Text)

Um eat them you stupid cunts instead of brutally catching live ones.

Yes eat the (probably poisoned) dead fish and kill off the human population good idea A+ we applaud you

rydenarmani

milthanks:

i have watched this at least 300 times and have laughed every single time